Body Mind Connection #2 – Elliptical Mind Models-2

Elliptical Mind Models #2

Three Energy Orbits

In my last post, I described how you can use the Qigong concept of “no straight lines” to enhance internal energy movement. This involved expanding the microcosmic orbit from a vertical ellipse to a much larger horizontal ellipse. You can use the same mind models to gain finer control and more insight into your energy centres. In this post, we will look at three powerful centres; one in your abdomen (Dantien), one in your chest (mid sternum/ Heart) and one in your head (mid skull/ Amygdala).

These three energy points are not only energy centres (chakras) , but gravity centres that lie at the mid points of their respective energy lines. In this post I’ll introduce them to you, but suffice to say there is a lot more that you can do with these centres other than feel internal energy around them.

If you have practiced the microcosmic orbit, you will be familiar with rotating an energy ball or energy flow around your body.

For each of the three energy centres (abdomen, chest, head) try to imagine an energy ball orbiting around a centre point. For example for your head energy centre, imagine the ball rolling vertically around the inside of your skull, up the back of your head and down the front of your head, just like it’s a small section of the microcosmic orbit. You can use the same vertical rotation with the abdominal center, imagining it is the lower section of the microcosmic orbit. Your chest centre can then be imagined as the centre section of the microcosmic orbit.

Once you have practiced these circular orbits, you can extend then forwards and backward to form extended ellipses much as you did with the complete microcosmic orbit (see diagram). Try rotating each elliptical orbit in turn and then try the complete microcosmic orbit again and feel for the nuances.

Your abdominal orbit can make you feel more rooted, your chest one more emotionally stable and your head orbit greater control over your body-mind.

The head orbit has some very powerful uses which you can try to discover – and I’ll write about them in my next post.

Enjoy!

Other posts:

Body-Mind Connection Through Elliptical Mind Models

Sending Yourself into a Microcosmic orbit

Body-Mind Connection Through Elliptical Mind Models

Elliptical Mind Models

elliptical mind-models

 

A powerful concept in qigong is “never move in straight lines”.  An example of this is a straight hand push out from a tucked in position at your side. If you push your hand straight out in front of you, slowly, your micro-movement control can be enhanced by imagining the straight movement as a curve in your mind (top diagram).

The concept of feeling movement inside your body is a strange one for many people.   But as more and more people realize that happiness, satisfaction and fulfillment are almost entirely within the grasp of your body-mind, the concept becomes less strange.

What the no straight lines approach engenders is micro-control as your mind checks what your body is doing every millimetre of the move you make.

This principle is powerful for physical movement, and can also be used very effectively for internal movement.

A simple, practical example of this is the microcosmic orbit. If you practice this already your probably already use some form of mind model to imagine a ball or energy flow going around your torso from your crown down your front, around the bottom of your groin area (PC) and back up your spine to your crown.

You can enhance the microcosmic orbit by extending the orbit model from a narrow vertical ellipse to a wider horizontal ellipse (lower diagram). The bigger and slower your ellipse, the more powerful it gets.

You can use this technique daily to not only calm yourself, but also do some useful, meaningful internal (qigong) exercise.

Enjoy!

Do try this. If you have any questions just ask, and if you want some more powerful internal training tools, drop me a line.

related post : microcosmic orbit

Cymatics and Body Energy

Cymatic Art

Someone asked me why I’m producing cymatic images – images of the effect of sounds on fluids (mostly water). The answer is, that quite simply having studied vibrational energy in the body, I wanted to see what it looked like. Now having taken literally hundreds of cymatic photographs, I know that what is often published as cymatics is the better formed patterns and images. In reality, the very regular patterns do occur but far less often than the semi-regular ones.

There are some very interesting results I have experienced from these less regular patterns. Firstly I find them more artistic than scientific, and therefore more appealing to me. Secondly, the patterns that do develop can often remind me of animals, flowers or sometimes other, man-made objects. And thirdly, I’m starting to see those patterns in the images I see when I close my eyes. Not the ones you get when you look at bright lights, but the other, more mundane, patterns that are invariably there when you close your eyes. I find the implications very interesting: the fluid in the blood vessels and spaces in the eyes must be vibrating at similar frequencies to the cymatic pictures I am taking.

Resonant Frequencies in the Body

Having researched this a little further, I found a table of the resonant frequencies in the body:

… and voila – they are very similar frequencies.

So what? Well once you are aware of things, you can start to look for and understand the implications and uses of resonance and dissonance. I hope that resonates with you – and that will be the subject of future posts!

Other, interesting information:

500px.com – cymatic-art

Enjoy!

J.

Your Breath as A Carrier – Part II – MCM Structured Breathing

Your Breath as A Carrier – Part II – MCM Structured Breathing

I’m glad that many people liked the post on ‘your breath as a carrier’, so I thought you might like some additional tools.The WHM is based on a number of key tenants, of which gaining control over the autonomic nervous system is key.

I have also noticed that the WHM uses a 3 phase approach to breathing in: 1) abdomen, 2) chest, 3) head. And Wim also emphasises that the focus is on breathing in and expanding the lung area as much as possible but that breathing-out is just letting go.

Just as focusing on your breath as a carrier allows you to visualize and harness your breath, using structured breathing allows you to get better control of the breathing/ mindfulness process. And the structured breathing is not separate from the breath visualization, it is just another layer, another tool in your tool-kit.

Reading the previous comments, this point is worth emphasizing: there is a difference between training and practice that is evident in most things we do. When training the focus is on big, slow movements – in practice and once these movements have been ingrained, you can make them both smaller and faster – with just as much, if not more, effect! In other words, this stuff takes some effort and focus to learn, but then becomes relatively automatic.

Breathing and movement go hand in hand, but maybe not as you know it. Most people focus on the ribs and diaphragm for breathing, but there is a trigger (trigger action) that brings both of these nicely into action – flexing your spine. And there is a trigger to get your spine flexing – tilting your pelvis.

Practicing structured breathing requires a little bit of set up to get you going:1) Stand gently upright with your knees slightly bent and soft (this allows you to flex your pelvis/ hips better) and let your arms hang loosely at your side. 2) Purse your lips, open your mouth and widen your throat – you are just going to let air flow in and out as it needs to.

Pelvis Tilt

Now without moving your head too much, tilt your pelvis top forwards and up (45 degrees) and pelvis bottom back and down (45 degrees). It will cause your back and abdomen to stretch and curve. You should also feel an intake of breath as your lower diaphragm drops. As you continue slowly to tilt your pelvis, you should also feel air being drawn into your chest area as the middle diaphragm drops. As you continue further, let your head go with the flexing of your spine and let it tilt back slightly (at 45 degrees up).

If you practice this slowly you should feel a distinct 1-2-3 phasing to the breath. Abdomen, chest, head. You can add to this feeling by dropping your jaw slightly as you start the flexing and expand your ribs as the flex reaches your chest. As you get to your head you should feel a distinct feeling of your head getting slightly lighter, or as Wim describes it – breathing into your head. At this point just let the breath as a carrier visualization take over the exchange of oxygen and Co2.

Letting Go

I find this next part lovely and relaxing. By tilting your hips, flexing your spine and expanding your rib cage you have nicely built in some elastic, bow power into your breathing cycle. As you feel you need to let your breath flow out, just tilt your pelvis the other way – let your pelvis bottom go forward, your pelvis top go back, and your spine flex the other way (to a forward facing U). Release the air in your lungs and encourage your head to tilt forward (45 degrees). That’s it.

Try this in a slow methodical way a few times and your body should map onto it fairly quickly – it is a natural way of moving and breathing. What you may also notice is the effect on your head and mental feeling. That’s because a few extra treats come with this way of breathing: toning the vagus nerve, pumping your sacrospinal fluid, releasing your ‘front line’, ‘charging your bows’, and of course using your breath as a energy carrier!

I hope you find that this makes a big difference to the control and depth of your WHM breathing and brings the relaxation and mindfulness aspects of it into clearer focus. It might also engender the concept of moving energy at will around your body.

Enjoy!
Julian.

(picture relevance: you might be playing all the right notes … but not necessarily in the right order!)

Wim Hof Method – Addin #2

WHM Addin #2

Following on my from my post on Mindfully Connected structured breathing, here is another simple trick to help with the breathing.

Out-Breath Hold

My out-breath hold length varies depending on whether I am in the shower or lying down. Lying down I can hold my out-breath after the 3 x 40 structured breathing for around 1.5 minutes – standing up for around 1 minute. The addin is on the in-breath hold.

In-Breath Hold

When breathing in, I keep my abdomen flat (i.e. I don’t let my abdomen expand). Then when I have taken the in-breath, I hold it and distribute the air around my body. The way I do this is, what I call, a 5 star mind-model. Imagine that your body is a star shape with it’s centre around your abdomen (dantien) and each part of the star pointing into your feet, your hands and your head. When I distribute the air in my body I push it along the points of the star, going around the star 2 times slowly (i.e. to a long count of ten). This gives a wonderful feeling of moving energy along your limbs and up your torso into your head and a mindful sensation of inflating the fascia around your body.

Enjoy!

Julian.

The next post in this series is Moving Mindfulness.